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Where to Buy Face Masks for Travel: Everything You Need to Know

by CASSIE SHORTSLEEVE May 14, 2020

As travel rules regarding masks grow, you’ll need one you actually like.

In a mere matter of months, face masks have gone from being exclusively reserved for healthcare workers to, in many instances, being required accessories for travel as the world slowly reopens in the midst of the novel coronavirus pandemic.

Ride-sharing companies like Lyft now require all passengers and drivers to wear face coverings. So do many airlines (JetBlueDelta, and more). Flight attendants are wearing them. Many local authorities have required residents to wear masks when they venture out from their homes. And you won’t be able to board an Amtrak train without one, either.

There are many good reasons why governing health bodies have called for the general public to wear masks. For one, masks help limit the spread of COVID-19 by protecting others from small droplets or particles that you could cough, sneeze, or breathe out and potentially—even unknowingly—infect someone with. By now, experts know that it’s possible to spread COVID-19 even if you don’t have symptoms.

But masks play another important role today, too: They remind us of the time we’re traveling in. “Masks give us a physical barrier that says something is different,” explains Neysa P. Ernst, nurse manager of the Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit.

If you’re not well, you should not travel; that goes without saying. But if a trip is in your foreseeable future, in addition to other protective efforts such as social distancing and hand washing, here’s what to keep in mind when purchasing or making a mask.

When to wear a mask

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends wearing cloth face coverings when you’re in public and when social distancing measures are hard to maintain (in an airport where you have to board a flight with others, for example).

But if you’re unsure about whether or not your trip warrants one, governing public health centers’ websites (the CDC or a local health department of a city you’re traveling to) are your best sources for up-to-date information. Be sure to heed regulations that your airlines or ride-sharing company has regarding masks, too.

As a default? Err on the side of caution and wear one. “Sometimes, it’s hard for people to understand that the health of the public in general depends on the actions of individual people,” says Aronoff. “Right now, we’re still in a situation where there’s still a lot of transmission of the virus going on. As we start to loosen regulations and people begin interacting more, it’s going to be important that people continue doing what they can to protect themselves and others.”

Additionally: The more people who wear masks, the more the act of wearing them is destigmatized, and the more others might feel comfortable donning one. It’s a collective effort that continues to work to flatten the curve.

Where to buy a mask

Amidst the pandemic, many retailers have pivoted their platforms to create and sell masks. Brands like MadewellClare V.Rag & BoneKenny FlowersOutdoor VoicesJack ThreadsSummersalt, and MINNA are selling packs of cotton masks, you can purchase face coverings on Amazon, and sports organizations like the NBA and WNBA are selling masks. You can even choose to wear a moisture-wicking balaclava-style hoodie or jumpsuit and mask set to cover your nose and mouth (and keep you warm on a flight).

Buying a mask can be a nice way to support your favorite business, too. “A very small part of the economy that’s actually seeing some growth is the creation of masks,” says Aronoff.

But if you’re crafty, the CDC notes that making your own is perfectly acceptable—and easier than you think. Essentially, all you need to do is cut a 20-inch square piece of cotton cloth (say from an old T-shirt or bedsheet) and use six-inch rubber bands, pieces of string, or hair ties to secure the mask behind your ears or head. (The CDC has a whole video tutorial of how to make your own mask.)

Just as you wouldn’t travel with one pair of socks, pack more than one mask and switch your mask if you notice it gets moist for both comfort and cleanliness.

Whether you buy or make your mask, be sure you’re using it properly, too. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds (or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60 percent alcohol—Orly and Ulta currently have some in stock) before putting it on. Don’t touch your face while wearing it and wash your hands again after you take it off. Make sure it covers both your nose and mouth, too, so that it can effectively work to contain any droplets that you could potentially transmit to others.

After all, no matter how chic, a mask won’t do its job if it’s not being used properly.

THANK YOU! MILLE GRAZIE!

I am honored and thankful to have received, and earned thanks to your continued support, the 2019 MVP Award for a second year in a row.

My gratitude to you all!

Rita

THE AGENCY PASADENA: Colleagues, Camaraderie and Cheer – just a Friday afternoon in Pasadena!

Posted on Sunday, February 23, 2020.

Enjoying our second year at The Agency Pasadena, colleagues gather to celebrate and share on the sun-drenched rooftop at Granville Restaurant located on Lake Avenue in Pasadena (across from our Agency Office at PASARROYO – a phenomenal Lifestyle Business Environment.

Thank Goodness It’s Friday 🙂

Burgers & Basketball: The Agency Gets in the Game for Giveback Homes

Posted on Tuesday, February 18, 2020.

Competitive spirits ran high as agents and staff faced off for a great cause in a lively basketball tournament at 18 Dovetail Lane. The event benefited The Agency’s charity partner—Giveback Homes—which builds housing for families and individuals in need around the U.S. and abroad. 

Located in Pasadena’s exclusive Bradbury Estates community, this Tudor-inspired, 16,515-square-foot home’s pristine sports court served as a perfect backdrop for the high-energy match between the two teams. Players in white jerseys represented the Westside, while players from Sherman Oaks, Pasadena and Calabasas donned red. Prior to the tournament, participating agents and employees donated to Giveback Homes. 

After a heated game, The Westside’s team edged out a victory, overtaking the red team 15 to 13. All the players celebrated with fresh burgers and fries from In-N-Out. 

“It was such a blast to have our team members come out and support Giveback Homes,” said Gus Ruelas, managing partner of The Agency Pasadena who also represents 18 Dovetail Lane. “Plus, this event gave our agents an up-close look at this estate’s spacious interiors and beautiful, entertainment-friendly grounds. This home is impeccably designed for gatherings of all sizes.”

The Agency is a proud partner with Giveback Homes, participating in Build Days across L.A., Orange County and Park City as well as hosting lively fundraising events—like the guest bartending party at Santa Monica’s ShoreBar.  

Cancer Support Community Pasadena |Upcoming Events

Please click here for details and time for all eventshttps://cscpasadena.org

COYOTE and WILDLIFE SAFETY.

IF YOUR PET IS SPRAYED BY A SKUNK

What to do if you or your pet get sprayed by a skunk. Homemade Skunk spray remedy.  This remedy can be used on pets, humans and items that have been sprayed.

Ingredients:

  • One quart 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • ¼ cup baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon liquid dish soap
  • Rubber gloves
  • Mix ingredients.

Wearing the rubber gloves, wet down your pet and message the mixture through the animal’s fur for three to four minutes. Rinse. Commercial Products: Nature’s Miracle Skunk Odor Remover (available at the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA store), Skunk-Off (available at most pet stores). If you would like more information, contact the wildlife department at 626/792-7151 x110

Coyote Basics

Coyotes are very well adapted to living in cities. Coyotes may be active at any time of day. Their diet consists of rabbits and rodents, carrion, birds and deer, supplemented with berries and other plant materials. If allowed, they will also prey on domestic pets such as cats.

Coyotes venture out in search of food and shelter. By removing any potential food sources from your home, you can prevent repeat coyote visits. Securing your own home is a good first step, but coexisting coyotes is truly a group effort, so be sure to share these tips with your neighbors.

Coyotes and food

Since coyotes tend to fear people, they are unlikely to approach or harm us. However, intentional or unintentional feeding can make them more comfortable around humans, leading to bolder behavior. As such, it is crucial to remove any potential source of food from coyotes.

  • Keep your cats inside and supervise small dogs outdoors.
  • Remove any outdoor pet food.
  • Remove any bird feeders you have set out.
  • Pick up fruit as soon as it falls to the ground.
  • Keep barbecue grills clean.
  • Eliminate access to water on your property, like standing water or bird baths.

SECURE YOUR HOME

In addition to seeking out food, coyotes will tend to linger anywhere they can find shelter. Secure your home so that coyotes will not find it hospitable.

  • Wildlife-proof garbage in sturdy containers with tight fitting lids.
  • Keep trash in a secure location and only take out trash the morning pick up is scheduled.
  • Keep compost in secure containers.
  • Secure your garage and don’t leave the door open unless necessary.
  • Cover your garden with chicken wire.
  • Trim overgrown landscaping and clear brush.
  • Close off crawl spaces under decks and around buildings.
  • Invest in motion detecting lights that make sound when activated, motion sensing water sprayers, or roll bar fencing.

ENCOUNTERING A COYOTE

Coyotes are typically very wary of humans and will do their best to avoid us. Take the following steps when you encounter one to ensure your safety:

  • Make the coyote feel uncomfortable.
  • Be aggressive. Yell or spray a hose at the coyote. Make loud noises or shake a can of pennies to scare the coyote away. Throw tennis balls.
  • Make yourself appear large and back away slowly.
  • Never turn your back or run away.
  • Walk your dog on a leash. You can lower your chance of encountering coyotes on your dog walks by avoiding walking your dog at dawn or dusk.
  • Make safety your first priority. In case of emergency, call 911.

HOW the Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA CAN HELP

  • We will visit your neighborhood association or community group to provide a wildlife presentation or interactive coyote safety workshop. For more information, contact 626.792.7151 ext. 114 or outreach@pasadenahumane.org.

Information Provided by Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA