Community

4 Fall Festivals in L.A. That Are Sure to Put You in a Gourd Mood

Los Angeles Magazine

By Natalya Jaime -September 24, 2019 |

Griffith Park Harvest Festival 

November 10

Breathe in some not-quite-crisp fall air at Griffith Park’s annual fall extravaganza, which has a beer garden for adults, a kids zone for children, and lots of food trucks and live music, including legit Bavarian polka purveyors, Hammerstein Band. The day of fun culminates in an outdoor, after-dark screening of Disney-Pixar’s heartstring tugger, Coco4730 Crystal Springs Dr., Griffith Park.

Los Angeles Fall Fair

October 25-November 3 (Wednesdays-Sundays)

If you have a go big or go home mindset, then the Los Angeles Fall Fair is up your alley. This South El Monte-set fest is the biggest in the L.A. area, boasting 12 acres of fun, from carnival rides to an international food court. 1600 Rosemead Blvd., South El Monte. 


All Hallows Ghostly Gallop: Horse Parade and Fall Festival

October 26

Horse lovers, head over to the historic Glendale Riverside Rancho for some fall-time fun. The All Hallows Ghostly Gallop: Horse Parade and Fall Festival will feature equestrians dressed in costumes, while parading through the grounds on horseback. Attendees will be able to participate in a costume contest and other activities will include adopt-a-pet, pumpkin decorating, short pony-trail rides, and more. Bette Davis Picnic Area, 1850 Riverside Dr., Glendale.


Mr. Bones Pumpkin Patch

October 5-30

Yes, Mr. Bones is a pumpkin patch, not a fall festival—but, really, there’s enough going on at the Culver City staple that it feels like a fall fest unto itself. In addition to the many lovely pumpkins for purchase or to photograph your children next to, the patch features pony rides, face painting, a petting zoo, a super slide, and more. Ticket prices vary. 10100 Jefferson Blvd., Culver City.

Cancer Support Community Pasadena |Upcoming Events

Please click here for details and time for all eventshttps://cscpasadena.org

October 1-31: Fred Astaire Dance Studio – Fees are donated to CSCP

October 24th: J. McLaughlin San Marino – Wine and Cheese while you shop.

November 16: Lavender Marketplace Holiday Charity Event – CSCP is the sole beneficiary at this holiday shopping event.

December 6-7″ Designs by Georgina Holiday Boutique – lunch and valet offered both days at this venue.

COYOTE and WILDLIFE SAFETY.

IF YOUR PET IS SPRAYED BY A SKUNK

What to do if you or your pet get sprayed by a skunk. Homemade Skunk spray remedy.  This remedy can be used on pets, humans and items that have been sprayed.

Ingredients:

  • One quart 3% hydrogen peroxide
  • ¼ cup baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon liquid dish soap
  • Rubber gloves
  • Mix ingredients.

Wearing the rubber gloves, wet down your pet and message the mixture through the animal’s fur for three to four minutes. Rinse. Commercial Products: Nature’s Miracle Skunk Odor Remover (available at the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA store), Skunk-Off (available at most pet stores). If you would like more information, contact the wildlife department at 626/792-7151 x110

Coyote Basics

Coyotes are very well adapted to living in cities. Coyotes may be active at any time of day. Their diet consists of rabbits and rodents, carrion, birds and deer, supplemented with berries and other plant materials. If allowed, they will also prey on domestic pets such as cats.

Coyotes venture out in search of food and shelter. By removing any potential food sources from your home, you can prevent repeat coyote visits. Securing your own home is a good first step, but coexisting coyotes is truly a group effort, so be sure to share these tips with your neighbors.

Coyotes and food

Since coyotes tend to fear people, they are unlikely to approach or harm us. However, intentional or unintentional feeding can make them more comfortable around humans, leading to bolder behavior. As such, it is crucial to remove any potential source of food from coyotes.

  • Keep your cats inside and supervise small dogs outdoors.
  • Remove any outdoor pet food.
  • Remove any bird feeders you have set out.
  • Pick up fruit as soon as it falls to the ground.
  • Keep barbecue grills clean.
  • Eliminate access to water on your property, like standing water or bird baths.

SECURE YOUR HOME

In addition to seeking out food, coyotes will tend to linger anywhere they can find shelter. Secure your home so that coyotes will not find it hospitable.

  • Wildlife-proof garbage in sturdy containers with tight fitting lids.
  • Keep trash in a secure location and only take out trash the morning pick up is scheduled.
  • Keep compost in secure containers.
  • Secure your garage and don’t leave the door open unless necessary.
  • Cover your garden with chicken wire.
  • Trim overgrown landscaping and clear brush.
  • Close off crawl spaces under decks and around buildings.
  • Invest in motion detecting lights that make sound when activated, motion sensing water sprayers, or roll bar fencing.

ENCOUNTERING A COYOTE

Coyotes are typically very wary of humans and will do their best to avoid us. Take the following steps when you encounter one to ensure your safety:

  • Make the coyote feel uncomfortable.
  • Be aggressive. Yell or spray a hose at the coyote. Make loud noises or shake a can of pennies to scare the coyote away. Throw tennis balls.
  • Make yourself appear large and back away slowly.
  • Never turn your back or run away.
  • Walk your dog on a leash. You can lower your chance of encountering coyotes on your dog walks by avoiding walking your dog at dawn or dusk.
  • Make safety your first priority. In case of emergency, call 911.

HOW the Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA CAN HELP

  • We will visit your neighborhood association or community group to provide a wildlife presentation or interactive coyote safety workshop. For more information, contact 626.792.7151 ext. 114 or outreach@pasadenahumane.org.

Information Provided by Pasadena Humane Society and SPCA